My friend Nancy is an artist and mandala maker.  She has been coming to my mandala get togethers for quite some time.  She hadn’t come for months, but made it to the last one a few weeks ago to finish the third mandala of a series of three.  These mandalas have helped her through a very  hard time.

Nancy’s adult son died after a long illness about four months ago.  How to explain her grief?  I can’t.  But she created a series of three mandalas that she wanted me to share on my blog to help others who may have gone through or will go through the experience of loss.  The mandalas helped  her express what she has experienced.  The mandala above was done shortly after her son passed.   She shared with me what the images and mandalas mean to her.  I am sharing her thoughts.

 

Her heart was broken and darkness flowed from it with great power.   Yet there was still joy in her life.

 

This is the second mandala, done a month or so later. The heart has grown.  Again sadness and joy are both here.

 

The darkness that flowed from her heart now shows love, but it is shadowed by the flow of black. The birds in flight, pasted on from another paper, give inspiration.  The edges of the rainbow shapes are softer and more curved than the angular ones on the first mandala. They also have less darkness in them.

 

 

 

The three spirals were to help her with the base chakras – the survival energy she needed to call upon.  There is a rainbow, but with shadows of darkness.

 

The third mandala was finished a week ago.  There is still darkness flowing from the heart, but it isn’t as dark.  The love flowing out is brighter.

 

There are still tears, but next to them is a butterfly emerging from a chrysalis.

 

A butterfly has emerged along with a clear rainbow.  And perhaps forever, questions that may never be answered.

 

I thank Nancy for sharing so much in her healing process.  She felt that the freedom to create openly in whatever expressive way,  but within the embrace of the mandala circle was so healing for her. As stated above, Nancy wanted these mandalas to be an inspiration for others, so that they too could be embraced by the safety and sacredness of a mandala circle. Within that circle; emotions, thoughts and spirit can be expressed and become companions on the journey through grief.

 

MANDALAS IN CLAY WORKSHOP

Nancy Kibens (the mandala artist above) is a ceramic artist.  I have loved her work for a long time and have several pieces.  Yesterday we talked about a workshop creating mandalas in clay, as both art pieces and functional bowls.  We hope to do this in January of 2014.  Stay tuned.

100 DAYS FOR MANDALAS – Starting next Monday August 12th. Please join. Here’s the invitation from the first 100 Days for Mandalas.

 

 

 

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2 Responses to Mandala Healing – A Companion Through the Journey of Grief

  1. Juli Lund says:

    I am the co-leader of a grief support group for those that have had a child die from any cause at any age. I wanted to do a mandala’s art project for our bereaved parents, siblings and grandparents. Anything you can share on educating us and ideas that might be helpful. I also wanted to see if it was okay if I printed the project above and used it as a hand-out. Please let me know. Thanks in advance for any suggestions or help.
    Juli Lund
    The Compassionate Friends – Kirkland

    • Linda Wiggen Kraft says:

      Hi Juli,
      Please go ahead and use the project from my blog in your work. I would first do a guided meditation or silence time before they start. Explain beforehand that a mandala is a symbol of an infinite embrace of wholeness, completeness. A circle never ends. Here is a link to a blog I did about a medical challenge I had.(http://www.creativityforthesoul.com/blog/matters-of-the-heart-art-mandala-healing/) In this blog is a mandala (the 4th image down) which was the first one I created after my mother died a few years ago. It is the energy of that embrace that I use to illustrate to others what the embrace of a mandala is. It is a place to make simple marks that let a person feel safe, embraced, held within a never ending circle. The point is not to “draw” anything, it is to be childlike and let the simple shapes, which are like doodles, come forth. In that place of safety hopefully those in your support group will feel a healing.
      LINDA

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